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In a previous post we talked about what pace means, how you can use it to get the most out of your training, and how it can help you prevent injury and fatigue. To take it a step further, we’ve designed this easy-to-use table to help you quickly determine your training pace based on your estimated finish time for a race.  It can also help you check if perhaps you’ve been going too fast on your training runs — a very common mistake made by most runners!

But what’s the harm in going too fast on my training runs, you ask?

Consistently run too fast in your training runs and there is a good chance you’ll throw your race goal out the window by showing up overworked on race day and in less than tip-top shape. 

Even worse, by running too fast you might even run yourself into an overuse injury (and this often means taking weeks or sometimes months of rest to heal and recover).

Running faster and farther than prescribed can feel like an achievement — especially if you’re a bit competitive and are training in a group environment.  However, doing so can be detrimental to your long-term progress and to your race-day performance.

The harder you run, the more time you need to recover. 

Certain runs, such as long runs or tempo runs, are considered “hard” runs, which need more time to recover than a short easy run.  A long run is a hard run because of the distance and a tempo run is considered a hard run because of the speed. 

You need more time to recover from hard runs because your body undergoes more wear and tear than an easy run.  Not allowing enough recovery means that you are overusing your muscles.  Overtime, this overuse will lead to overuse injuries, fatigue, and burnout.

A well-written training schedule will allow for enough recovery days in between your hard runs, and will include short easy runs (also called recovery runs) on days when you might still need to recover from a hard run.  This is why it is so import to run easy on your easy days.

Run too fast on an easy run and you are no longer recovering, but creating more stress for your body that will then add more time to your recovery.  Do another hard run a couple of days after your bit-too-fast-easy-run, and there is a very good chance you will not be fully recovered from your two previous runs.  This inhibits you from getting the most out of your next training session, plus puts you at more risk for overuse injuries.

Run too fast on your long runs, and you unnecessarily make these runs even harder than they were intended to be.  Again, causing you to need even more recovery.  Not properly recovering from these runs will wear your body down over time, minimizing your potential on race day.  It may even lead you to injury which will keep you from running at all.

And what about going too slow?

It’s better to go too slow than to go too fast! 

For many runners, this is hard to do.  Slowing it down too much might feel awkward or boring, especially if you like speed!  There is a good chance that you’re not running too slow.  If your choice of running buddies is either going a bit fast or going a bit slow, you’re far better off running with your slower buddy.  

Running too fast is far more detrimental to your performance and progress than running too slow.  Of course, every person has their limits.  One wouldn’t suggest a 5:00 min./km 10K race-pace runner to do their long runs with a 7:00 min./km runner. 

(On the subject of speed training and pace, we’ll post more on that later.)

The Easy Run Training Pace Table

This table will also allow you to view your suggested training pace for a 10K, 10 Mile, half marathon, or full marathon.

Click here to view, print, or download the table.

Use this table to find your target easy run (or long run) training pace, or to determine your race pace given your current training pace. 

If your goal is to finish a marathon in 4:30:00, then according to the table, a good training pace for you might be 7:00 min/km. 

If you are currently going at 6:00 min/km pace for your long easy runs, the table matches you at a goal finish time of around 3:50:00.  If this sounds unreasonable to you, you could adjust your training pace to a more reasonable goal finish time.

If you’re goal is to finish an event before the time limit, then you might fall into the suggested pace group that is marked in yellow.  The pace marked in yellow means that you can consider this your average running pace, including waking or short breaks.

 

10K (hr: m’ ss”)

Finish Time
(mm’ ss”)
Race Pace
(m’ ss” / km)
Training Pace easy run
(m’ ss” / km)
40′ 00” 4′ 00” 4′ 24”
40′ 30” 4′ 03” 4′ 27”
41′ 00” 4′ 06” 4′ 31”
41′ 30” 4′ 09” 4′ 34”
42′ 00” 4′ 12” 4′ 37”
42′ 30” 4′ 15” 4′ 41”
43′ 00” 4′ 18” 4′ 44”
43′ 30” 4′ 21” 4′ 47”
44′ 00” 4′ 24” 4′ 50”
44′ 30” 4′ 27” 4′ 54”
45′ 00” 4′ 30” 4′ 57”
45′ 30” 4′ 33” 5′ 00”
46′ 00” 4′ 36” 5′ 04”
46′ 30” 4′ 39” 5′ 07”
47′ 00” 4′ 42” 5′ 10”
47′ 30” 4′ 45” 5′ 13”
48′ 00” 4′ 48” 5′ 17”
48′ 30” 4′ 51” 5′ 20”
49′ 00” 4′ 54” 5′ 23”
49′ 30” 4′ 57” 5′ 27”
50′ 00” 5′ 00” 5′ 30”
50′ 30” 5′ 03” 5′ 33”
51′ 00” 5′ 06” 5′ 37”
51′ 30” 5′ 09” 5′ 40”
52′ 00” 5′ 12” 5′ 43”
52′ 30” 5′ 15” 5′ 47”
53′ 00” 5′ 18” 5′ 50”
53′ 30” 5′ 21” 5′ 53”
54′ 00” 5′ 24” 5′ 56”
54′ 30” 5′ 27” 6′ 00”
55′ 00” 5′ 30” 6′ 03”
55′ 30” 5′ 33” 6′ 06”
56′ 00” 5′ 36” 6′ 10”
56′ 30” 5′ 39” 6′ 13”
57′ 00” 5′ 42” 6′ 16”
57′ 30” 5′ 45” 6′ 20”
58′ 00” 5′ 48” 6′ 23”
58′ 30” 5′ 51” 6′ 26”
59′ 00” 5′ 54” 6′ 29”
59′ 30” 5′ 57” 6′ 33”
1: 00′ 00” 6′ 00” 6′ 36”
1: 01′ 00” 6′ 06” 6′ 43”
1: 02′ 00” 6′ 12” 6′ 49”
1: 03′ 00” 6′ 18” 6′ 56”
1: 05′ 00” 6′ 30” 7′ 09”
1: 06′ 00” 6′ 36” 7′ 16”
1: 07′ 00” 6′ 42” 7′ 22”
1: 08′ 00” 6′ 48” 7′ 29”
1: 09′ 00” 6′ 54” 7′ 35”
1: 10′ 00” 7′ 00” 7′ 42”
1: 12′ 00” 7′ 12” 7′ 55”

 

10EM (hr: m’ ss”)

Finish Time
(hr: mm’)
Race Pace
(m’ ss” / km)
Training Pace easy run
(m’ ss” / km)
1: 05′ 4′ 02” 4′ 27”
1: 06′ 4′ 06” 4′ 31”
1: 07′ 4′ 10” 4′ 35”
1: 08′ 4′ 14” 4′ 39”
1: 09′ 4′ 17” 4′ 43”
1: 10′ 4′ 21” 4′ 47”
1: 11′ 4′ 25” 4′ 51”
1: 12′ 4′ 28” 4′ 55”
1: 13′ 4′ 32” 4′ 59”
1: 14′ 4′ 36” 5′ 04”
1: 15′ 4′ 40” 5′ 08”
1: 16′ 4′ 43” 5′ 12”
1: 17′ 4′ 47” 5′ 16”
1: 18′ 4′ 51” 5′ 20”
1: 19′ 4′ 55” 5′ 24”
1: 20′ 4′ 58” 5′ 28”
1: 21′ 5′ 02” 5′ 32”
1: 22′ 5′ 06” 5′ 36”
1: 23′ 5′ 10” 5′ 40”
1: 24′ 5′ 13” 5′ 45”
1: 25′ 5′ 17” 5′ 49”
1: 26′ 5′ 21” 5′ 53”
1: 27′ 5′ 24” 5′ 57”
1: 28′ 5′ 28” 6′ 01”
1: 29′ 5′ 32” 6′ 05”
1: 30′ 5′ 36” 6′ 09”
1: 31′ 5′ 39” 6′ 13”
1: 32′ 5′ 43” 6′ 17”
1: 33′ 5′ 47” 6′ 21”
1: 34′ 5′ 51” 6′ 26”
1: 35′ 5′ 54” 6′ 30”
1: 36′ 5′ 58” 6′ 34”
1: 37′ 6′ 02” 6′ 38”
1: 38′ 6′ 05” 6′ 42”
1: 39′ 6′ 09” 6′ 46”
1: 40′ 6′ 13” 6′ 50”
1: 41′ 6′ 17” 6′ 54”
1: 42′ 6′ 20” 6′ 58”
1: 43′ 6′ 24” 7′ 02”
1: 44′ 6′ 28” 7′ 07”
1: 45′ 6′ 32” 7′ 11”
1: 46′ 6′ 35” 7′ 15”
1: 47′ 6′ 39” 7′ 19”
1: 48′ 6′ 43” 7′ 23”
1: 49′ 6′ 46” 7′ 27”
1: 50′ 6′ 50” 7′ 31”
1: 51′ 6′ 54” 7′ 35”
1: 52′ 6′ 58” 7′ 39”
1: 53′ 7′ 01” 7′ 44”
1: 54′ 7′ 05” 7′ 48”
1: 55′ 7′ 09” 7′ 52”

 

21,1K (hr: m’ ss”)

Finish Time
(hr: mm’)
Race Pace
(m’ ss” / km)
Training Pace easy run
(m’ ss” / km)
1: 30′ 4′ 16” 4′ 42”
1: 31′ 4′ 19” 4′ 45”
1: 32′ 4′ 22” 4′ 48”
1: 33′ 4′ 24” 4′ 51”
1: 34′ 4′ 27” 4′ 54”
1: 35′ 4′ 30” 4′ 57”
1: 36′ 4′ 33” 5′ 00”
1: 37′ 4′ 36” 5′ 03”
1: 38′ 4′ 39” 5′ 07”
1: 39′ 4′ 42” 5′ 10”
1: 40′ 4′ 44” 5′ 13”
1: 41′ 4′ 47” 5′ 16”
1: 42′ 4′ 50” 5′ 19”
1: 43′ 4′ 53” 5′ 22”
1: 44′ 4′ 56” 5′ 25”
1: 45′ 4′ 59” 5′ 28”
1: 46′ 5′ 01” 5′ 32”
1: 47′ 5′ 04” 5′ 35”
1: 48′ 5′ 07” 5′ 38”
1: 49′ 5′ 10” 5′ 41”
1: 50′ 5′ 13” 5′ 44”
1: 51′ 5′ 16” 5′ 47”
1: 52′ 5′ 18” 5′ 50”
1: 53′ 5′ 21” 5′ 53”
1: 54′ 5′ 24” 5′ 57”
1: 55′ 5′ 27” 6′ 00”
1: 56′ 5′ 30” 6′ 03”
1: 57′ 5′ 33” 6′ 06”
1: 58′ 5′ 36” 6′ 09”
1: 59′ 5′ 38” 6′ 12”
2: 00′ 5′ 41” 6′ 15”
2: 01′ 5′ 44” 6′ 18”
2: 02′ 5′ 47” 6′ 22”
2: 03′ 5′ 50” 6′ 25”
2: 04′ 5′ 53” 6′ 28”
2: 05′ 5′ 55” 6′ 31”
2: 06′ 5′ 58” 6′ 34”
2: 07′ 6′ 01” 6′ 37”
2: 08′ 6′ 04” 6′ 40”
2: 09′ 6′ 07” 6′ 44”
2: 10′ 6′ 10” 6′ 47”
2: 15′ 6′ 24” 7′ 02”
2: 20′ 6′ 38” 7′ 18”
2: 25′ 6′ 52” 7′ 34”
2: 30′ 7′ 07” 7′ 49”
2: 35′ 7′ 21” 8′ 05”
2: 40′ 7′ 35” 8′ 20”
2: 45′ 7′ 49” 8′ 36”
2: 50′ 8′ 03” 8′ 52”
2: 55′ 8′ 18” 9′ 07”
3: 00′ 8′ 32” 9′ 23”

 

42,2K (hr: m’ ss”)

Finish Time
(hr: mm’)
Race Pace
(m’ ss” / km)
Training Pace easy run
(m’ ss” / km)
3: 10′ 4′ 30” 4′ 57”
3: 12′ 4′ 33” 5′ 00”
3: 14′ 4′ 36” 5′ 03”
3: 16′ 4′ 39” 5′ 07”
3: 18′ 4′ 42” 5′ 10”
3: 20′ 4′ 44” 5′ 13”
3: 22′ 4′ 47” 5′ 16”
3: 24′ 4′ 50” 5′ 19”
3: 26′ 4′ 53” 5′ 22”
3: 28′ 4′ 56” 5′ 25”
3: 30′ 4′ 59” 5′ 28”
3: 32′ 5′ 01” 5′ 32”
3: 34′ 5′ 04” 5′ 35”
3: 36′ 5′ 07” 5′ 38”
3: 38′ 5′ 10” 5′ 41”
3: 40′ 5′ 13” 5′ 44”
3: 42′ 5′ 16” 5′ 47”
3: 44′ 5′ 18” 5′ 50”
3: 46′ 5′ 21” 5′ 53”
3: 48′ 5′ 24” 5′ 57”
3: 50′ 5′ 27” 6′ 00”
3: 52′ 5′ 30” 6′ 03”
3: 54′ 5′ 33” 6′ 06”
3: 56′ 5′ 36” 6′ 09”
3: 58′ 5′ 38” 6′ 12”
4: 00′ 5′ 41” 6′ 15”
4: 05′ 5′ 48” 6′ 23”
4: 10′ 5′ 55” 6′ 31”
4: 15′ 6′ 03” 6′ 39”
4: 20′ 6′ 10” 6′ 47”
4: 25′ 6′ 17” 6′ 54”
4: 30′ 6′ 24” 7′ 02”
4: 35′ 6′ 31” 7′ 10”
4: 40′ 6′ 38” 7′ 18”
4: 45′ 6′ 45” 7′ 26”
4: 50′ 6′ 52” 7′ 34”
4: 55′ 6′ 59” 7′ 41”
5: 00′ 7′ 07” 7′ 49”
5: 05′ 7′ 14” 7′ 57”
5: 10′ 7′ 21” 8′ 05”
5: 15′ 7′ 28” 8′ 13”
5: 20′ 7′ 35” 8′ 20”
5: 25′ 7′ 42” 8′ 28”
5: 30′ 7′ 49” 8′ 36”
5: 35′ 7′ 56” 8′ 44”
5: 40′ 8′ 03” 8′ 52”
5: 45′ 8′ 11” 9′ 00”
5: 50′ 8′ 18” 9′ 07”
5: 55′ 8′ 25” 9′ 15”
6: 00′ 8′ 32” 9′ 23”
7: 00′ 9′ 57” 10′ 57”

 

Are you running at your suggested training pace or going a bit faster or slower?  And how is that working for you?

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Got questions or comments?  Please post them below.  We’d love to hear from you!

Laurie

Laurie is an endurance athlete, a professional running coach & lifestyle coach, and the founder of House of Running. She helps people make running part of their healthy lifestyle through on-on-one coaching and fun group training programs. Read more about Laurie here.

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